Dartmouth North Active Transportation Planning Project

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Welcome to the Dartmouth North project planning page! Here you'll find project documents linked on the right-hand menu. Scroll down to find diagrams of proposed street changes to improve conditions for people walking, rolling and cycling.

PROJECT OVERVIEW

The municipality is planning street upgrades and repairs in Dartmouth North. This planning project will help ensure these upgrades improve road safety and accessibility for all road users, and reflect what the community would like to see.

The goals of the Dartmouth North Active Transportation Planning Project are to:Preferred Dartmouth North Cycling Route: Highfield Park Drive-Victoria Road-Farrell Street-Farrell Park

  • Design a bicycle route that connects the Burnside Greenway to Wyse Rd at Albro Lake Rd
  • Identify pathway and street improvements for walking and biking in Dartmouth North

Two rounds of public engagement were conducted throughout 2021, and a preferred cycling route (pictured right) has been identified. The planning process and preferred cycling route are summarized below.

Based on what we heard from the public and stakeholders, this preferred route is not only direct and convenient for cyclists but also features street and intersection improvements making it easier for Dartmouth North residents to walk and bike to important destinations on either side of Victoria Road, including the Dartmouth North Library on Highfield Park Drive and the Boys and Girls Club on Farrell Street.

Local streets and pathways will also be repaved with improvements identified during this planning process. These streets and pathways include: Brule Street, Pinecrest Street and Jason MacCullough Park.

Based on what we heard from Dartmouth North residents, we will be recommending another future planning study focused only on Victoria Road to further improve community connectivity and improvements for people walking, rolling and cycling.

These recommendations will be proposed to Regional Council later this year. To learn more or provide feedback, please see the "Who's Listening" contact information at the top right-hand side of this page.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

ROUND 1 - Summer 2021

Engagement activities included:Painted Bike Promoting the Project on Highfield Park Drive

  • Pop-up events and paper surveys distributed at the Dartmouth North library
  • Interviews with stakeholders and long term residents of Dartmouth North
  • Online surveys and social media promotion
  • Painted bikes placed in key community locations to promote the project to passers-by

To view feedback gathered during this first round of public engagement, please see the What We Heard Report linked on the right-hand side of this page. Three Dartmouth North priority cycling route options were then developed to address some of the community concerns and feedback we heard. To view these routes in more detail, please see the Map - Priority Route documents linked on the right-hand side of this page.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

ROUND 2 - Winter 2021

Engagement activities included:Dartmouth North Library Pop-up Event

  • Over 5,000 letter mailed to residents to promote the public survey, pop-up events, etc.
  • Lived-experience focus group with Dartmouth North residents
  • Pop-up events and paper surveys distributed at the Dartmouth North library
  • Online surveys and social media promotion

The results of this public engagement have been summarized in the What We Heard Report: Round 2 Public Engagement linked on the right-hand side of this page.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW WEBINAR RECORDING from Round 2 public engagement.

THE PREFERRED ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION ROUTE

We heard from survey respondents and local residents that the route from Highfield Park Drive to Victoria to Farrell Street (pictured below) would improve community connectivity and also be a direct route for people cycling.

This route also provides a missing sidewalk connection from Brule Street Park to the corner of Highfield Park Drive, which will make it easier for community members to walk, roll and bike to the Dartmouth North Library, Transit Terminal and beyond.

Separated two-way bike lanes are proposed beside the sidewalks to reduce user conflicts and make travel safer and more convenient for people walking & rolling and people biking. Separating people walking and people biking also improves conditions for people of all ages and abilities, including seniors, those using assistive devices such as wheel chairs and blind or partially sighted people.

The below route and cross section diagrams highlight the proposed changes.

Active Transportation Route and Street Cross Sections:

BACKGROUND

The Dartmouth North Active Transportation Planning Project is part of a municipal plan to connect communities, and make neighbourhoods more comfortable places to bike, walk or roll.

The Integrated Mobility Plan (IMP) intends to improve the transportation links between residents and their communities, and active transportation (AT) options are an important component. The IMP focuses on creating connected, healthy, affordable and sustainable travel options, and provides direction to create infrastructure like sidewalks, pathways, transit options and road changes.

WHAT IS ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION?

Active transportation (AT) is about providing comfortable spaces for people to bike, walk or roll. Promoting AT involves both infrastructure and programs. Good active transportation networks make it easier to travel around the city without a car, which can improve access within a community or to regional shops and services, as well as many other benefits.

WHAT IS AT INFRASTRUCTURE?

Active transportation infrastructure usually refers to sidewalks, bike lanes, multi-use pathways, trails and local street bikeways. AT is enhanced when it includes complete street elements such seating, signage, green space, or public art. The infrastructure on a street shapes how it’s used.

Welcome to the Dartmouth North project planning page! Here you'll find project documents linked on the right-hand menu. Scroll down to find diagrams of proposed street changes to improve conditions for people walking, rolling and cycling.

PROJECT OVERVIEW

The municipality is planning street upgrades and repairs in Dartmouth North. This planning project will help ensure these upgrades improve road safety and accessibility for all road users, and reflect what the community would like to see.

The goals of the Dartmouth North Active Transportation Planning Project are to:Preferred Dartmouth North Cycling Route: Highfield Park Drive-Victoria Road-Farrell Street-Farrell Park

  • Design a bicycle route that connects the Burnside Greenway to Wyse Rd at Albro Lake Rd
  • Identify pathway and street improvements for walking and biking in Dartmouth North

Two rounds of public engagement were conducted throughout 2021, and a preferred cycling route (pictured right) has been identified. The planning process and preferred cycling route are summarized below.

Based on what we heard from the public and stakeholders, this preferred route is not only direct and convenient for cyclists but also features street and intersection improvements making it easier for Dartmouth North residents to walk and bike to important destinations on either side of Victoria Road, including the Dartmouth North Library on Highfield Park Drive and the Boys and Girls Club on Farrell Street.

Local streets and pathways will also be repaved with improvements identified during this planning process. These streets and pathways include: Brule Street, Pinecrest Street and Jason MacCullough Park.

Based on what we heard from Dartmouth North residents, we will be recommending another future planning study focused only on Victoria Road to further improve community connectivity and improvements for people walking, rolling and cycling.

These recommendations will be proposed to Regional Council later this year. To learn more or provide feedback, please see the "Who's Listening" contact information at the top right-hand side of this page.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

ROUND 1 - Summer 2021

Engagement activities included:Painted Bike Promoting the Project on Highfield Park Drive

  • Pop-up events and paper surveys distributed at the Dartmouth North library
  • Interviews with stakeholders and long term residents of Dartmouth North
  • Online surveys and social media promotion
  • Painted bikes placed in key community locations to promote the project to passers-by

To view feedback gathered during this first round of public engagement, please see the What We Heard Report linked on the right-hand side of this page. Three Dartmouth North priority cycling route options were then developed to address some of the community concerns and feedback we heard. To view these routes in more detail, please see the Map - Priority Route documents linked on the right-hand side of this page.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

ROUND 2 - Winter 2021

Engagement activities included:Dartmouth North Library Pop-up Event

  • Over 5,000 letter mailed to residents to promote the public survey, pop-up events, etc.
  • Lived-experience focus group with Dartmouth North residents
  • Pop-up events and paper surveys distributed at the Dartmouth North library
  • Online surveys and social media promotion

The results of this public engagement have been summarized in the What We Heard Report: Round 2 Public Engagement linked on the right-hand side of this page.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW WEBINAR RECORDING from Round 2 public engagement.

THE PREFERRED ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION ROUTE

We heard from survey respondents and local residents that the route from Highfield Park Drive to Victoria to Farrell Street (pictured below) would improve community connectivity and also be a direct route for people cycling.

This route also provides a missing sidewalk connection from Brule Street Park to the corner of Highfield Park Drive, which will make it easier for community members to walk, roll and bike to the Dartmouth North Library, Transit Terminal and beyond.

Separated two-way bike lanes are proposed beside the sidewalks to reduce user conflicts and make travel safer and more convenient for people walking & rolling and people biking. Separating people walking and people biking also improves conditions for people of all ages and abilities, including seniors, those using assistive devices such as wheel chairs and blind or partially sighted people.

The below route and cross section diagrams highlight the proposed changes.

Active Transportation Route and Street Cross Sections:

BACKGROUND

The Dartmouth North Active Transportation Planning Project is part of a municipal plan to connect communities, and make neighbourhoods more comfortable places to bike, walk or roll.

The Integrated Mobility Plan (IMP) intends to improve the transportation links between residents and their communities, and active transportation (AT) options are an important component. The IMP focuses on creating connected, healthy, affordable and sustainable travel options, and provides direction to create infrastructure like sidewalks, pathways, transit options and road changes.

WHAT IS ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION?

Active transportation (AT) is about providing comfortable spaces for people to bike, walk or roll. Promoting AT involves both infrastructure and programs. Good active transportation networks make it easier to travel around the city without a car, which can improve access within a community or to regional shops and services, as well as many other benefits.

WHAT IS AT INFRASTRUCTURE?

Active transportation infrastructure usually refers to sidewalks, bike lanes, multi-use pathways, trails and local street bikeways. AT is enhanced when it includes complete street elements such seating, signage, green space, or public art. The infrastructure on a street shapes how it’s used.