HalifACT: Acting on Climate Together

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HalifACT is more than a plan - it's a commitment to reducing emissions, switching to clean and reliable energy sources and demonstrating local government leadership. This transformational plan aligns the municipality’s efforts to support an equitable shift to a low-carbon economy by 2050. It is considered the most ambitious climate plan in Canada.

The Halifax Regional Municipality will continue to plan development and support our builders with a changing climate in mind. However, there is more work to do – HalifACT is about what we do together to address climate change over the next 30 years.

The plan will also help communities adapt by raising awareness about climate hazards and helping them better prepare. In addition to the environmental benefits, the implementation of this plan will lead to economic opportunities, healthier communities and a more resilient Halifax.

By working together, we can shape the future of Halifax for generations to come:

SAVE money: reduce your energy consumption

CUT emissions: consider transportation alternatives

PREVENT loss: be prepared for climate-related emergencies

STRENGTHEN communities: become more informed and involved

HalifACT is more than a plan - it's a commitment to reducing emissions, switching to clean and reliable energy sources and demonstrating local government leadership. This transformational plan aligns the municipality’s efforts to support an equitable shift to a low-carbon economy by 2050. It is considered the most ambitious climate plan in Canada.

The Halifax Regional Municipality will continue to plan development and support our builders with a changing climate in mind. However, there is more work to do – HalifACT is about what we do together to address climate change over the next 30 years.

The plan will also help communities adapt by raising awareness about climate hazards and helping them better prepare. In addition to the environmental benefits, the implementation of this plan will lead to economic opportunities, healthier communities and a more resilient Halifax.

By working together, we can shape the future of Halifax for generations to come:

SAVE money: reduce your energy consumption

CUT emissions: consider transportation alternatives

PREVENT loss: be prepared for climate-related emergencies

STRENGTHEN communities: become more informed and involved

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Adaptation Survey: Map Hazards in your Community

over 1 year

Climate change is changing our landscape and we want to know from you - have you experienced a hazard in your region related to climate change? 

These could be floods, forest fires, wind, coastal erosion, sea level rise, invasive species, storm surge, drought, or something else. Please place a pin on our map to indicate where the hazard is so we can better understand the challenges of our community. You can upload a photo to accompany your pin, and can also provide more information if desired.

How do I know if I've experienced a hazard related to climate change?

Flood - Includes inland or coastal areas (especially near waterways/water bodies) that become temporarily flooded after heavy rains or snowfalls, during high tides, or during the spring melt. This can even include streets that frequently experience flooding due to stormwater accumulation or lack of adequate drainage. Climate change is expected to alter precipitation patterns, leading to heavier rainfalls over a short period of time. Natural or historic floodplains could be susceptible to flooding where surface run-off naturally accumulates around waterways and water bodies.

Forest fire - Includes wooded areas where there is a lot of understorey brush, blown down trees or thick over-mature forest that could serve as fuel during severe forest fire conditions. Climate Change is expected to alter precipitation patterns throughout the year and increase temperature extremes, which during dry periods could influence the risk of forest fires in certain wooded areas.

Wind - Includes built-up or natural areas that are exposed to high and potentially damaging winds during storms, such as the southern side of Point Pleasant Park, Peggy’s Cove, or exposed buildings at higher elevations. Climate change is expected to impact the intensity of weather events such as  hurricanes over time, which could result in higher wind extremes and higher risk of wind damage in exposed areas.

Drought - Includes areas that experience very dry conditions during long periods without significant rainfall, or following winters when there hasn’t been a lot of snow. Indicators of drought could be dry or low wells, water-stressed vegetation, receding shorelines on lakes or waterways, and prolonged, frequent dry conditions. Climate change is expected to change precipitation and temperature extremes, potentially leading to longer dry periods and other periods of  more frequent, intense precipitation.

Coastal erosion - Includes coastal areas, as well as inland waterways, where wave action and/or extreme water levels are causing the shoreline earth and vegetation to be lost, gradually moving the shoreline inland over time. Erosion may result from a single extreme event or could be continuous. Sea-level rise will increase rates of coastal erosion in areas that are already vulnerable to it.

Invasive species - Includes built-up or natural areas where non-native or alien species, which may or may not be harmful to public health, have become established. Examples of invasive species harmful to public health are Giant Hogweed, Wild Parsnip, and even Lyme Disease, which is believed to have spread to this region from elsewhere. Other notable invasive species include Fire Ants, Brown Spruce Longhorn Beetles, Japanese Knotweed and Yellow Floating Heart. Climate change is expected to create more favourable climates/conditions for invasive species, including those whose range is expanding northward over time.

Storm surge - Includes coastal areas that are exposed to extreme water levels and onshore winds during storm events or passing low pressure systems. Storm surges can impact natural or built-up coastal areas, including coastal roads (e.g., Queensland Provincial Beach access road). Changes in the intensity of storm events that are expected as a result of climate change, plus the rapid sea-level rise resulting from it, will increase the frequency of potentially damaging storm surges in coastal areas.