Peninsula South Complete Streets

Improvements are being considered for several streets including University Avenue, Morris Street and Robie Street (south of University Avenue).

This project will apply a "complete streets" approach to improving mobility for people travelling through the south end of the Halifax peninsula, with a focus on improving comfort, safety and convenience for people walking and cycling while also considering transit, accessibility, placemaking, urban forestry, vehicle traffic, loading, parking and other factors.

The resulting functional plan will recommend improvements to pedestrian infrastructure and new all-ages-and-abilities (AAA) cycling connections along several streets as identified in the Integrated Mobility Plan and Active Transportation Priorities Plan.

The objective for the new AAA cycling routes is to:

  • Connect the Halifax Urban Greenway to Lower Water Street, as well as Dalhousie University's three campuses and the hospitals along the way.
  • Connect University Avenue to the Saint Mary’s University campus.

The project will also establish a common design vocabulary, or “District Identity,” for University Avenue that reflects the unique character of the area and will shape any changes made to the street.

We want to hear from you as we begin to develop the plan.Thank you to everyone who attended and participated in our two public workshops. We will also be hosting several pop-up sessions where residents will have the opportunity to contribute ideas and shape the future of the Peninsula South Complete Streets project. Please consider joining us!

What do we mean by “Complete Streets”?

Complete Streets is one of the Foundational Policies of the Integrated Mobility Plan (IMP). The objective of the policy is to “meet the needs of all ages, abilities and travel modes in the design and maintenance of streets.” This is achieved through a holistic, flexible and context-sensitive approach to designing new streets or changes to existing streets.

The Complete Streets approach implements multiple design features to accommodate various combinations of transportation modes, including walking, cycling, using transit and driving. The context and intended role of a street are critical factors in establishing a Complete Street design.

To learn more about the municipality’s Complete Streets approach, check out Section 2.3 of the Integrated Mobility Plan.

Improvements are being considered for several streets including University Avenue, Morris Street and Robie Street (south of University Avenue).

This project will apply a "complete streets" approach to improving mobility for people travelling through the south end of the Halifax peninsula, with a focus on improving comfort, safety and convenience for people walking and cycling while also considering transit, accessibility, placemaking, urban forestry, vehicle traffic, loading, parking and other factors.

The resulting functional plan will recommend improvements to pedestrian infrastructure and new all-ages-and-abilities (AAA) cycling connections along several streets as identified in the Integrated Mobility Plan and Active Transportation Priorities Plan.

The objective for the new AAA cycling routes is to:

  • Connect the Halifax Urban Greenway to Lower Water Street, as well as Dalhousie University's three campuses and the hospitals along the way.
  • Connect University Avenue to the Saint Mary’s University campus.

The project will also establish a common design vocabulary, or “District Identity,” for University Avenue that reflects the unique character of the area and will shape any changes made to the street.

We want to hear from you as we begin to develop the plan.Thank you to everyone who attended and participated in our two public workshops. We will also be hosting several pop-up sessions where residents will have the opportunity to contribute ideas and shape the future of the Peninsula South Complete Streets project. Please consider joining us!

What do we mean by “Complete Streets”?

Complete Streets is one of the Foundational Policies of the Integrated Mobility Plan (IMP). The objective of the policy is to “meet the needs of all ages, abilities and travel modes in the design and maintenance of streets.” This is achieved through a holistic, flexible and context-sensitive approach to designing new streets or changes to existing streets.

The Complete Streets approach implements multiple design features to accommodate various combinations of transportation modes, including walking, cycling, using transit and driving. The context and intended role of a street are critical factors in establishing a Complete Street design.

To learn more about the municipality’s Complete Streets approach, check out Section 2.3 of the Integrated Mobility Plan.

Peninsula South Complete Streets Map

19 days
Before you add a pin to the map, Complete a few simple survey questions to help us understand who we are reaching. Then, participate in the Interactive Map to tell us: 

What would be your ideal future travel experience in the Peninsula South area?
Please use the map pins to tell your story about your ideal future travel experience - refer to the instructions below.

This mapping tool allows you to leave open comments for all to see. To make a comment on the map:
  • Pick one of the map pins (click the "add pin" icon in the menu on...

Before you add a pin to the map, Complete a few simple survey questions to help us understand who we are reaching. Then, participate in the Interactive Map to tell us: 

What would be your ideal future travel experience in the Peninsula South area?
Please use the map pins to tell your story about your ideal future travel experience - refer to the instructions below.

This mapping tool allows you to leave open comments for all to see. To make a comment on the map:
  • Pick one of the map pins (click the "add pin" icon in the menu on the left) and drag it to the spot on the map that you would like to comment about
  • A box will pop-up from the pin; leave your comment or a photo, and indicate how much of priority this is for you
  • Refer to the Legend for reference information about each map pin type
  • Refer to the Making Connections booklet to see the cycling route options being considered for connections to the east and west of University Avenue
  • Refer to the Bicycle Facility Dictionary for more information about the different types of cycling infrastructure being considered for this project.
  • Drop as many map pins as you like
  • To change the position of your newly added pin, simply drag the pin to the new location
  • For inspiration, refer to this catalogue of examples and ideas
  • Click on the pink dots along the streets to receive information about constraints or conditions to consider 
To zoom in and out, click on the plus and minus buttons in the lower right corner of the screen.

Legend (Pin Types)

Walking – Most people walk at some point during their travels. Safe, comfortable crossings are major considerations, as well as design features that create a pleasant walking experience.

Accessibility – Inclusive streets and public places have features that ensure access for everyone, including people who use assistive devises or have visual impairments.

Bicycling – The safety and comfort of people cycling is greatly enhanced with routes that are designed for all ages and abilities, which includes physical separation from vehicle traffic on busy streets.

Transit - Bus stops indicate locations where public transit will stop along a particular route. They sometimes have covered structures, lighting, benches and other amenities.

Traffic - The design and configuration of roadways and intersections influences vehicle speeds and how traffic flows.

Loading - Designated loading areas are for pick-up and drop-off of people and goods. They are spaces for short-term use and may have restricted hours.

Parking – Parking provides storage for personal vehicles. Accessible spaces enable access for people who experience physical mobility barriers.

Atmosphere – The look, mood or feel of a place is greatly influenced by its design. Atmosphere is an important part of how people experience a place.

Seating - Seating features offer a place to rest for groups or single users. They include benches, seat walls and outdoor dining furniture.

Plantings – Gardens, trees and other vegetation provide many benefits: beautification, stormwater management, shade, wind shelter, and habitat.

Public Art or Interpretation – Art, sculpture or written panels help establish a sense of place, share historic or cultural information and provide interest or beauty in a neighbourhood.

Study Area Notes

Morris Street 

  • Morris Street is 10.2 metres wide (curb to curb), and currently has 2 metre-sidewalks on each side, one traffic lane in each direction, and intermittent on-street parking for approximately 68 vehicles. Morris Street is a transit route and secondary route for trucks leaving the port.
  • Morris Street crosses through the Schmidtville Heritage Conservation District.
  • Clyde Street is in a period of development and transformation. Its width and characteristics make it suitable to consider as a future local street bikeway.
University Avenue 
  • University Avenue, Morris Street and Robie Street (south of University Ave) are identified in the Integrated Mobility Plan and Active Transportation Priorities Plan as strategic links connecting with other existing and planned cycling facilities on South Park Street, Hollis Street, Lower Water Street, Vernon/Seymour Street, and the Halifax Urban Greenway.
  • The section of University Avenue west of Robie Street currently has protected bike lanes that were implemented as a pilot project in 2016. HRM is maintaining this facility until this planning project is complete and more permanent infrastructure can be installed.
  • Seymour Street, Cartaret Street and Oakland Road have characteristics that make them suitable to consider for a future local street bikeway.
  • South Street is 9.1 metres wide (curb to curb) and currently has a sidewalk on each side, one traffic lane in each direction and one side of on-street parking. It is also a transit route.
  • University Avenue, between Robie Street and South Park Street, is part of the Halifax Common.